Research Competencies in Counseling

Expected by CACREP

Excerpts from:

Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs. 2001 Standards.

SECTION II: PROGRAM OBJECTIVES AND CURRICULUM

STANDARDS FOR CAREER COUNSELING PROGRAMS

STANDARDS FOR MARITAL, COUPLE, AND FAMILY COUNSELING/THERAPY PROGRAMS

The Practice of Professional Counseling: Doctoral Standards

COUNSELOR EDUCATION AND SUPERVISION


SECTION II:   PROGRAM OBJECTIVES AND CURRICULUM

I.   Evidence exists of the use and application of research data among program faculty and students.

K.   Curricular experiences and demonstrated knowledge in each of the eight common core areas are required of all students in the program. The eight common core areas follow.

1.   PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY - studies that provide an understanding of all of the following aspects of professional functioning:

c.   technological competence and computer literacy;

4.   CAREER DEVELOPMENT - studies that provide an understanding of career development and related life factors, including all of the following:

b.   career, avocational, educational, occupational and labor market information resources, visual and print media, computer-based career information systems, and other electronic career information systems;

f.   assessment instruments and techniques that are relevant to career planning and decision making;

g.   technology-based career development applications and strategies, including computer-assisted career guidance and information systems and appropriate world-wide web sites;

5.   HELPING RELATIONSHIPS - studies that provide an understanding of counseling and consultation processes, including all of the following:

c.   counseling theories that provide the student with a consistent model(s) to conceptualize client presentation and select appropriate counseling interventions. Student experiences should include an examination of the historical development of counseling theories, an exploration of affective, behavioral, and cognitive theories, and an opportunity to apply the theoretical material to case studies. Students will also be exposed to models of counseling that are consistent with current professional research and practice in the field so that they can begin to develop a personal model of counseling;

6.   GROUP WORK - studies that provide both theoretical and experiential understandings of group purpose, development, dynamics, counseling theories, group counseling methods and skills, and other group approaches, including all of the following:

c.   theories of group counseling, including commonalties, distinguishing characteristics, and pertinent research and literature;

7.   ASSESSMENT - studies that provide an understanding of individual and group approaches to assessment and evaluation, including all of the following:

a.   historical perspectives concerning the nature and meaning of assessment;

b.   basic concepts of standardized and nonstandardized testing and other assessment techniques including norm-referenced and criterion-referenced assessment, environmental assessment, performance assessment, individual and group test and inventory methods, behavioral observations, and computer-managed and computer-assisted methods;

c.   statistical concepts, including scales of measurement, measures of central tendency, indices of variability, shapes and types of distributions, and correlations;

d.   reliability (i.e., theory of measurement error, models of reliability, and the use of reliability information);

e.   validity (i.e., evidence of validity, types of validity, and the relationship between reliability and validity;

f.   age, gender, sexual orientation, ethnicity, language, disability, culture, spirituality, and other factors related to the assessment and evaluation of individuals, groups, and specific populations;

g.   strategies for selecting, administering, and interpreting assessment and evaluation instruments and techniques in counseling;

h.   an understanding of general principles and methods of case conceptualization, assessment, and/or diagnoses of mental and emotional status; and

i.   ethical and legal considerations.

8.   RESEARCH AND PROGRAM EVALUATION - studies that provide an understanding of research methods, statistical analysis, needs assessment, and program evaluation, including all of the following:

a.  the importance of research and opportunities and difficulties in conducting research in the counseling profession,

b.   research methods such as qualitative, quantitative, single-case designs, action research, and outcome-based research;

c.   use of technology and statistical methods in conducting research and program evaluation, assuming basic computer literacy;

d.   principles, models, and applications of needs assessment, program evaluation, and use of findings to effect program modifications;

e.   use of research to improve counseling effectiveness; and

f.   ethical and legal considerations.

STANDARDS FOR CAREER COUNSELING PROGRAMS

C.   KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS FOR CAREER COUNSELOR

2.   Research and Evaluation

a.   knowledge about and skills in applying basic statistics and statistical procedures appropriate to research related to career counseling and development; and

b.   knowledge about and skills in designing and conducting studies and disseminating major research findings related to career counseling and developmental processes and effectiveness.

STANDARDS FOR MARITAL, COUPLE, AND FAMILY COUNSELING/THERAPY PROGRAMS

C.   KNOWLEDGE AND SKILL REQUIREMENTS FOR MARITAL, COUPLE, AND FAMILY COUNSELOR/THERAPISTS

5.   research and technology applications in marital, couple, and family counseling/therapy.

The Practice of Professional Counseling: Doctoral Standards

COUNSELOR EDUCATION AND SUPERVISION

Doctoral degree programs in Counselor Education and Supervision are intended to prepare students to work as counselor educators, supervisors, and advanced practitioners in academic and clinical settings. Doctoral programs accept as a primary obligation extending the knowledge base of the counseling profession in a climate of scholarly inquiry. Doctoral programs prepare students to generate new knowledge for the counseling profession through research that results in dissertations that are appropriate to the field of counselor education or supervision. This extension of knowledge should take into account the societal changes of the 21st century and prepare graduates to be leaders and advocates for change. The doctoral program standards are intended to accommodate the unique strengths of different programs. Doctoral programs for which accreditation is sought must encompass all of the entry-level program standards. Students admitted to doctoral programs must have completed studies that meet CACREP entry-level standards as specified in Sections II, III, and in a specific program, and provide evidence of a knowledge base of a professional counselor.

Section II - Program Objectives and Curriculum

A.   Doctoral program objectives address the professional leadership roles of counselor education, supervision, advanced counseling practice, and research competencies expected of doctoral graduates.

C.   Learning experiences beyond the entry-level are required in all of the following content areas:

5.   design and implementation of quantitative research and methodology, including univariate, multivariate, and single-subject design;

6.   design and implementation of qualitative research, including grounded theory, ethnographic, and phenomenological methodologies;

7.   models and methods of assessment and use of data;

8.   ethical and legal considerations in counselor education and supervision (e.g., the ACA Code of Ethics)

D.   It is expected that doctoral students will have experiences that are designed to:

2.   develop collaborative relationships with program faculty in teaching, supervision, research, professional writing, and service to the profession and the public;

3.   foster participation in professional counseling organizations, including the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) and ACA;

5.   promote scholarly counseling research; and

6.   enhance technical competence.


Last modified January 31, 2007
by Boris Teske, Prescott Memorial Library,
Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272