Research Competencies in Interior Design

Expected by CIDA

Excerpts from:

Council for Interior Design Accreditation. Accreditation Manual. Grand Rapids, MI: Council for Interior Design Accreditation, January 2006.

II. Professional Standards

Standard 1

Standard 2

Standard 3

Standard 4

Standard 5

Standard 6

Standard 7

Standard 8

Standard 9

Standard 10

Standard 11

Standard 12

III. Guidance for Self-Study

Identify Self-Study Measures and Methods

X. Resources

Program Inputs

Program Outcomes

Key Terms ... Identify Inputs and Outcomes

What is Global Perspective?

What is Wayfinding?

NCIDQ Definition of Interior Design


II. Professional Standards

Standard 1. Curriculum Structure

The curriculum is structured to facilitate and advance student learning.

Indicators

a) The curriculum MUST follow a logical sequence.

b) Course content MUST increase in degree of difficulty.

c) Significant concepts MUST be interrelated and reinforced throughout the curriculum.

d) Projects MUST demonstrate variety and complexity in type, size, and scope.

e) The curriculum MUST provide exposure to a variety of business, organizational, and familial structures (for example, for-profit, non-profit, publicly vs. privately held, hierarchical, flat, co-housing, nuclear and extended family).

The teaching and learning methods MUST incorporate:
f) the experience of team approaches to design solutions.
g) experiences that provide interaction with multiple disciplines (for example, code specialists, engineers, architects, artists, behaviorists) representing a variety of points of view and perspectives on design problems.

The program MUST provide:
h) interaction with practicing professionals (for example, as jurors, project critics, guest lecturers, mentors).
i) opportunities for design work experience (for example, internship, co-op, shadowing, or other experiences that familiarize students with the culture and environment of the professional studio and professional practice).

Guidance: Use the indicators to determine whether the standard is met. Program inputs and outcomes are evaluated to determine compliance with this standard. Analyze the curriculum, syllabi, project descriptions or briefs, handouts, and blank exams. Review student work and its progression, variety, and complexity. Do not focus on the work of individual students, but look at the student work as a whole. In other words, take a broad view and seek the preponderance of evidence. If the standard has been met, student work will include a variety of project types and the work will progress in complexity and degree of difficulty.

(II-8)

Standard 2. Professional Values

The program leads students to develop the attitudes, traits, and values of professional responsibility, accountability, and effectiveness.

Indicators

The program MUST provide learning experiences that address:
a) client and user needs and their responses to the interior environment.
b) professional ethics and the role of ethics in the practice of interior design.
c) environmental ethics and the role of sustainability in the practice of interior design.
d) a global perspective and approach to thinking and problem solving (viewing design with awareness and respect for cultural and social differences of people; understanding issues that affect the sustainability of the planet; understanding the implications of conducting the practice of design within a world market).

The program MUST include learning experiences that incorporate:
e) critical, analytical, and strategic thinking.
f) creative thinking (exhibit a variety of ideas, approaches, concepts with originality and elaboration).
g) the ability to think visually and volumetrically.
h) professional discipline (for example, time management, organizational skills).
i) active listening skills leading to effective interpretation of requirements (for example, programming interviews, participatory critiques, role playing).

j) The program MUST present opportunities or experiences that address the value and importance of community or public service.

Guidance: Use the indicators to determine whether the standard is met. Program inputs -- not outcomes -- are evaluated to determine compliance with this standard. For example, while students’ ethical behavior cannot be evaluated, the program’s efforts to lead students to behave in an ethical manner can be evaluated. Review syllabi, lecture outlines, handouts, or evidence of opportunities for role playing and similar experiences. Discuss such topics with students to learn how and where these are covered in the curriculum.

It may not be practical for all students at all programs to participate in community or public service. The expectation is that there is discussion regarding the importance of being connected to and supportive of the community in which a designer practices. Look for evidence of actual service or discussions regarding social responsibility.

If the standard has been met, the program has incorporated learning experiences and opportunities intended to lead students to develop the professional values outlined in the standard.


(II-9)

Standard 3. Design Fundamentals

Students have a foundation in the fundamentals of art and design; theories of design, green design, and human behavior; and discipline-related history.

(II-10)

Standard 4. Interior Design

Students understand and apply the knowledge, skills, processes, and theories of interior design.

Indicators

Student work MUST follow a process and demonstrate the ability to:
a) apply 2-dimensional design elements and principles in interior design projects.
b) apply 3-dimensional design elements and principles to the development of the spatial envelope (for example, volumes of space, visual continuity and balance, visual passages, interconnecting elements).
c) select and apply color in interior design projects.

Student work MUST demonstrate programming skills, including:
d) problem identification.
e) identification of client and user needs.
f) information gathering research and analysis (functional requirements, code research, sustainability issues, etc.).

Student work MUST demonstrate competent schematic design, concept development, and problem solving skills, including:
g) concept statements.
h) the ability to rapidly visualize concepts through sketching.
i) space planning (adjacencies, circulation, and articulation and shaping of space).

Student work MUST demonstrate competent design development skills in:
j) selection of interior finishes and materials
k) detailed and developed layout of furniture, fixtures, and equipment.
l) detailed and developed furniture selection.
m) space plans, elevations, sketches, and study models (computer-generated or manual).
n) selection and application of luminaires and lighting sources.
o) justifying design solutions relative to the goals and objectives of the project program.
p) appropriate selection and application of decorative elements (for example, trim, hardware, paneling).

q) Student work MUST demonstrate competent skills in preparing drawings, schedules, and specifications as an integrated system of contract documents, appropriate to project size and scope and sufficiently extensive to show how design solutions and interior construction are related. These could include construction/demolition plans, power plans, lighting/reflected ceiling plans, finish plans, furniture, fixtures, and equipment plans, data/voice telecommunication plans, elevations, sections, and details, interior building specifications, furniture specifications, finish schedules, door schedules, etc. (The intent of this indicator is to demonstrate how contract documents are used as an integrated system. Documents should not be scattered across the curriculum, but neither do all examples need to be evidenced in a single project.)

Student work SHOULD demonstrate design development skills, including:
r) appropriate selection and application of art and accessories.
s) the ability to design custom interior elements (for example, case goods, floor patterning, textiles).
t) wayfinding methods.
u) graphic identification, such as signage.

Guidance: Use the indicators to determine whether the standard is met. Program inputs and outcomes are evaluated to determine compliance with the standard. Review syllabi, project descriptions, handouts, and blank exams for studio and other courses in which design problems are assigned. In evaluating students’ skills, do not focus on the work of individual students, but look at the student work as a whole. In other words, take a broad view and seek the preponderance of evidence. Observing and interviewing students will assist in evaluating some indicators. For example, students might be asked, "What is the problem your design is solving and what led you to this solution?" If the standard has been met, student work will demonstrate that the students understand and can apply the knowledge, skills, processes, and theories outlined in the indicators.

(II-11, II-12)

Standard 5. Communication

Students communicate effectively.

Indicators

Student work MUST demonstrate competence in:
a) drafting and lettering, both manual and computer-aided techniques.
b) illustrative sketching.
c) presentation of color, materials, and furnishings (for example, sample boards, collages, mock-ups, digital representations).

Students MUST:
d) express ideas clearly in oral presentations and critiques.
e) communicate clearly in writing (using correct spelling, grammar, and syntax) in specifications, schedules, and contracts and other business-related documents such as project programs, concept statements, reports, research papers, resumes, and correspondence.

Student work MUST demonstrate the ability to:
f) render by any medium, manual or computer-generated, that successfully communicates the design intent.
g) communicate 3-dimensional space and form, such as in perspectives, paralines, and models (computer-generated or manual).

Student work SHOULD demonstrate the ability to:
h) apply the metric system to design work.
i) communicate through alternative presentation techniques (for example, audio, electronic, film, photography, slides, video).

Guidance: Use the indicators to determine whether the standard is met. Program outcomes are evaluated to determine compliance with the standard. Evaluate sketches, drawings, and other presentation materials. Review student reports and research papers. Do not focus on the work of individual students, but look at the student work as a whole. In other words, take a broad view and seek the preponderance of evidence. Interview students, observe presentations or videotapes, and review jurists’ evaluations. If the standard is met, students and their work must demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively.

(II-13)

Standard 6. Building Systems and Interior Materials

Students design within the context of building systems. Students use appropriate materials and products.



(II-14, II-15)

Standard 7. Regulations

Students apply the laws, codes, regulations, standards, and practices that protect the health, safety, and welfare of the public.

Indicators

a) Student work MUST demonstrate understanding of the impact of fire and life safety principles on space planning (for example, compartmentalization [fire separation], movement [stairwells, corridors, exitways], detection [smoke/heat detectors and alarm systems], suppression [sprinklers/fire hose cabinets].

Student work MUST demonstrate the appropriate application of:
b) codes and regulations (for example, International Building Code [IBC]) and standards (for example, American National Standards Institute [ANSI]).
c) barrier-free design guidelines (for example, Americans with Disabilities Act).
d) ergonomic and human factors data.

Students MUST demonstrate understanding of the impact on health and welfare of:
e) indoor air quality.
f) noise.
g) lighting.

h) Student work MUST demonstrate understanding of universal design concepts and principles.

Guidance: Use the indicators to determine whether the standard is met. Program inputs and outcomes are evaluated to determine compliance with the standard. Review the curriculum to determine where these topics are covered. Review syllabi, project descriptions, handouts, and blank exams in conjunction with applicable student work. Do not focus on the work of individual students, but look at the student work as a whole. In other words, take a broad view and seek the preponderance of evidence.

If the standard is met, student work will demonstrate concern for the health, safety, and welfare of the public through the proper application of laws, codes, regulations, and standards. The expectation is not that students prepare sprinkler and life safety drawings, but the majority of student work should reflect compliance with fire and life safety principles or other codes. Interviews with students will assist in determining how the information is covered and whether such topics are a regular part of studio project reviews.


(II-16)

Standard 8. Business and Professional Practice

Students have a foundation in business and professional practice.

Indicators

Students MUST demonstrate understanding of project management practices:
a) estimating (for example, project costs, fees).
b) budget management.
c) coordination (managing input from various members of the project team), time management, scheduling, and contract administration.
d) information management (collecting and disseminating relevant project information).
e) conflict resolution (facilitating solutions to conflicting objectives).
f) assessment processes (for example, post-occupancy evaluation, productivity, square-footage ratios, life cycle assessment).

Students MUST demonstrate knowledge of:
g) certification, licensing, and registration requirements.
h) professional design organizations.

i) Students SHOULD demonstrate understanding of basic business computer applications (for example, word processing, spreadsheets).

j) Students SHOULD demonstrate knowledge of business processes (for example, marketing, strategic planning, and accounting procedures).

Guidance: Use the indicators to determine whether the standard is met. Program inputs and outcomes are evaluated to determine compliance with the standard. Review the curriculum to determine where these topics are covered. Review syllabi, project descriptions, handouts, and blank exams in conjunction with applicable student work (for example, papers, project management documents, budgets). Do not focus on the work of individual students, but look at the student work as a whole. In other words, take a broad view and seek the preponderance of evidence. Student interviews will assist in evaluating some of the indicators. For example, students might be asked questions related to project management practices, budgets, or schedules. If the standard has been met, students will demonstrate that they have a foundation in business and professional practice.

(II-17)

Standard 9. Faculty

Faculty members and other instructional personnel are qualified and adequate in number to implement program objectives


(II-18)

Standard 10. Facilities

Program facilities and resources provide an environment to stimulate thought, motivate students, and promote the exchange of ideas.


(II-19)

Standard 11. Administration

The administration of the program is clearly defined, provides appropriate program leadership, and supports the program. The program demonstrates accountability to the public through its published documents.


(II-20)

Standard 12. Assessment

Systematic and comprehensive assessment methods contribute to the program’s ongoing development and improvement.

Indicators

a) The program uses input from various groups (for example, enrolled students, faculty members, employers, alumni, Advisory Board, local design organizations) to evaluate program effectiveness and develop and implement strategies for improvement.

b) The program regularly monitors and evaluates professional placement of alumni.

Guidance: Use the indicators to determine whether the standard is met. Review assessment methods and results. With the indicators in mind, meet with students, faculty, alumni, employers, and members of the community. If the standard is met, the program will demonstrate that assessment methods are used in program development.

(II-21)


III. Guidance for Self-Study

Step 1. Determine self-study purpose and objectives

Step 2. Create a plan and timetable for completion of steps 3-9

Step 3. Identify self-study criteria

Step 4. Identify self-study measures and methods – the what and how

Identifying self-study measures and methods is a critical step in which you determine what and how you will evaluate program achievement of criteria. Measures describe "the what" - evidence or data you are seeking, whereas methods describe "the how" – ways in which you will collect evidence or data. Not all measures are suited to all criteria. In the same respect, not all methods are suited to all programs. You will need to identify the most appropriate measures for specific criteria and what methods best suit your program’s culture and resources.

Measures describe what evidence or data you are seeking in order to evaluate achievement of criteria.

Common measures in evaluating achievement of Council for Interior Design Accreditation Standards include:

      • Quality of student learning and skills
      • Curriculum content
      • Employer satisfaction
      • Student satisfaction
      • Community satisfaction
      • Faculty credentials and evidence of competence
      • Employment types and rates of graduates
      • Grades

The Council for Interior Design Accreditation uses the terms "program inputs" and "program outcomes" to further define measures of achievement in Educational Program Standards (Standards 1-8). In this way, the Council helps you identify appropriate measures by which to evaluate achievement of Standards and indicators.

Program Inputs

Indicators under Standards 1 and 2 are focused primarily on program inputs, and use the following terms to help focus the evaluator on inputs:

      • Curriculum
      • Course content
      • Project assignments
      • Teaching and learning methods
      • Learning experiences
      • Opportunities

Inputs are information, exercises, project assignments, and experiences provided by the program.

The curriculum, teaching methods, learning experiences, and opportunities made available to students are sources for evaluating program inputs and include:

      • Curriculum structure
      • Course syllabi, including lecture topics
      • Handouts
      • Course texts
      • Reading assignments
      • Examination questions (blank tests)
      • Assignments including purpose, objectives, and requirements
      • Field trips
      • Guest lecturers
      • Work experience/internships
      • Community service

For example, Standard 2, indicator a reads, "The program MUST provide learning experiences that address client and user needs and their responses to the interior environment."

Seeing the term "learning experiences" in the above indicator tells the program to focus on program inputs. In this case, the measures of achievement will be project types, handouts, texts, reading assignments, exams, class assignments, field trips, guest lecturers, work experiences, etc. that address client and/or user needs and their responses to the environment.

Program Outcomes
Indicators under Standards 3-8 are focused primarily on student performance and use the following terms to help focus the evaluator on outcomes:

      • Student work
      • Students
      • Competent skills, understanding, knowledge, appropriate application, ability (the level of student performance required to meet the indicator)

Outcomes are evidence of learning revealed in student performance.

Interaction with students on site and completed student work are sources for evaluating student performance and include:

      • Student interviews (demonstrating understanding or knowledge)
      • Student presentations (in person or on video)
      • Completed student work including, but not limited to:
        • Matrixes
        • Bubble diagrams/schematics
        • Sketches/drawings
        • Concept development
        • Exploration of a variety of design ideas
        • Design refinement
        • 2 and 3-D basic creative work
        • Drafting
        • CAD drawings
        • Perspectives
        • Design proposals
        • Programming documents
        • Detailing and working drawings
        • Business documents
        • Research papers
        • Completed and graded exams (with student names removed)

For example, Standard 6, indicator a reads, "Students MUST demonstrate understanding that design solutions affect and are impacted by construction systems and methods (for example, wood-frame, steel-frame, masonry, concrete)."

Seeing the terms "students" and "understanding" in the above indicator tells the program to focus on outcomes, or student performance, to evaluate achievement. In this case, the program may conduct student interviews and review student presentations and/or student work to determine the extent to which students understand that design solutions affect and are impacted by construction systems and methods.


(III-4, III-5, III-6)


X. Resources

Understanding program inputs and outcomes as tools for evaluation.
Educational Program Standards (1-8)

Guidance boxes direct you to consider:

Program Inputs

Inputs are information, exercises, project assignments, and experiences provided by the program.

The curriculum, teaching methods, learning experiences, and opportunities made available to students are sources for evaluating program inputs and include:

  • Curriculum structure
  • Course syllabi, including lecture topics
  • Handouts
  • Course texts
  • Reading assignments
  • Examination questions (blank tests)
  • Assignments including purpose, objectives, and requirements
  • Field trips
  • Guest lecturers
  • Work experience/internships
  • Community service

Program Outcomes

Outcomes are evidence of learning revealed in student performance.

Interaction with students on site and completed student work are sources for evaluating student performance and include:

      • Student interviews (demonstrating understanding or knowledge)
      • Student presentations (in person or on video)
      • Completed student work including, but not limited to:

    • Matrixes
    • Bubble diagrams/schematics
    • Sketches/drawings
    • Concept development
    • Exploration of a variety of design ideas
    • Design refinement
    • 2 and 3-D basic creative work
    • Drafting
    • CAD drawings
    • Perspectives
    • Design proposals
    • Programming documents
    • Detailing and working drawings
    • Business documents
    • Research papers
    • Completed and graded exams (with student names removed)

Key Terms in the Indicators Identify Inputs and Outcomes

Indicators under Standards 1 and 2 are focused primarily on program inputs and use the following terms to help focus the evaluator on inputs:

      • Curriculum
      • Course content
      • Project assignments
      • Teaching and learning methods
      • Learning experiences
      • Opportunities

Indicators under Standards 3-8 are focused primarily on student performance and use the following terms to help focus the evaluator on outcomes:

      • Student work
      • Students
      • Competent skills, understanding, knowledge, appropriate application, ability (the level of student performance required to meet the indicator)


(X-6, X-7)

What is Global Perspective?

Understanding the role of a "Global Perspective" in the education of interior design students.

In Standard 2: Professional Values, interior design programs are asked to provide learning experiences that address "a global perspective and approach to thinking and problem solving"(indicator d). In the Glossary, "global perspective" is defined as "viewing design with awareness and respect for cultural and social differences of people; understanding issues that affect the sustainability of the planet; understanding the implications of conducting the practice of design within a world market."

Globalization is a term that has many definitions. Some focus on the flow of goods and services across national boundaries, others are concerned with the connectivity of people and ideas. Our current times have been called the "era of globalization."

What does this mean for interior design programs and their students? What is the appropriate amount of information for professional level programs and where is this information best presented? The answers may be sought in a close look at the definition.

The Council for Interior Design Accreditation definition has three distinct parts that can be addressed individually. The first - "viewing design with awareness and respect for cultural and social differences of people" – might be seen as a logical extension of the programming phase of design during which the collection of information about a problem requires a designer to understand the culture in which the client operates. Working in a global market requires the development of good research skills that will enable an interior designer to draw on accurate sources of information to understand social and business cultures different from their own.

The second part - "understanding issues that affect the sustainability of the planet" - recognizes the responsibility that designers have for their decisions regarding processes and materials. These decisions have wide ranging implications extending beyond national boundaries. Understanding the entire lifecycle of materials is only one facet of this responsibility, which also includes building and environmental systems, and products. The Council has expanded its expectations regarding the components of sustainable design and more guidelines for implementation are provided on page X-11 of the Accreditation Manual, "What is Sustainability."

The third part of the Council’s definition – "understanding the implications of conducting the practice of design within a world market" – asks interior designers to consider their role in the design and building process and how it is affected by the interconnectedness of people, place, and information. This third facet takes into account the other two and asks for an understanding of how this knowledge might be applied in practice.

Using the definition as a guide, programs can place the elements into many different courses and learning experiences. Research skills and programming might be taught in a specific course, but are also a part of every studio to some extent. Issues of individual and group behavior should be expanded beyond those of one particular culture. Information about business practices is also sometimes consolidated but becomes a component of many other technical and design courses. And the issues of global perspective, like universal design, can be woven throughout the curriculum.

To evaluate student understanding one would look for input in the form of project descriptions, research assignments, and lecture topics across technical and design courses. Exposure to professionals with global design experience may enrich student understanding. Outcomes can be seen in concept statements for design solutions, student-selected research topics, and "capstone projects".

(X-10, X-11)

What is Wayfinding?

Understanding and evaluating the behavioral concept of "wayfinding"” in the work of interior design students.

"Wayfinding"-- a term found in the literature of environment and behavior studies refers to the strategies used to successfully navigate natural and built environments. Wayfinding involves the psychological processes of perception and cognition. People perceive sensory information and gain knowledge of the environment through experience with it. This information is used to form "cognitive images" or "mental maps" of the physical environment which are tools for relating one place to another, getting around, and predicting where to go next. The ability to form these cognitive images and find our way around the physical environment is critical to our survival and functioning. Because this ability can be aided or hindered by the design of the environment, it is important that interior design students address wayfinding needs, and understand how their design decisions will impact people’s ability to build those essential cognitive maps of their surroundings.

Educational Program Standard 4 states that "Students understand and apply the knowledge, skills, processes, and theories of interior design"; and it includes an indicator requiring that "Student work should demonstrate design development skills, including: t) wayfinding methods".

What are these methods and how might they be demonstrated in student work?

To some, demonstrating design development skills in wayfinding simply means the integration of a signage system into the design proposal. Indeed, signage is a useful wayfinding tool, but as Michael O’Neil (1991) found, it is a less important influence than the complexity of the plan configuration. Research actually suggests that there are multiple factors that influence wayfinding behavior. Important insight into how design influences our ability to construct mental images and find our way in the environment has been provided by the work of Kevin Lynch, Gerald D. Weisman, and Michael O'Neil, among others.

Particularly useful to design education are the architectural design variables that Gerald D. Weisman (1979, 1981) identified as related to the ease with which people could comprehend and construct mental images of the environment, and use them to find their way within it. He found that factors influencing the legibility of an environment -- i.e. how easy it is to read and remember -- include a) a meaningful system of signs and numbers; b) architectural differentiation or features that help distinguish one place in a building from another; c) places offering perceptual access (visible or acoustic) to destinations, or from one area to another along a route; and d) plan configurations that are simpler, easily described, and easy to remember.

To evaluate student work for its ability to demonstrate design development skills in wayfinding, we might look for any or all of the following:
a) Has there been consideration of placement and design of signage?
b) Are there design elements that distinguish places within a building that might be similar in structure, such as the ends of corridors or elevator lobbies on different floors or in different parts of a building?
c) Are there interior windows or glass doors that provide views from one space into another.
d) Are there cut outs or partial height walls that allow sound to signal activity areas?
e) Are there exterior views from corridors that would help with large-scale orientation?
f) Are plan configurations unnecessarily complex? Or do they use symmetry and limited numbers of turns along routes to facilitate imaging the overall building layout?

Student intentions with regard to these design strategies might be clarified and reinforced in concept statements, drawing annotations, or design program performance criteria. They may also be seen in research or analysis projects where students study wayfinding behavior in existing spaces; formulate evaluations of the building’s legibility; and offer proposals for appropriate design modifications to enhance occupants’ wayfinding experience. There are many ways that our educational programs might guide and reflect student learning with regard to wayfinding and building legibility. More important than the instructional method and project type used to demonstrate this set of design development skills is that wayfinding methods be understood to encompass more than the integration of a signage system.

(X-14, X-15)

NCIDQ Definition of Interior Design

Interior design is a multi-faceted profession in which creative and technical solutions are applied within a structure to achieve a built interior environment. These solutions are functional, enhance the quality of life and culture of the occupants, and are aesthetically attractive. Designs are created in response to and coordinated with the building shell , and acknowledge the physical location and social context of the project. Designs must adhere to code and regulatory requirements, and encourage the principles of environmental sustainability . The interior design process follows a systematic and coordinated methodology, including research, analysis and integration of knowledge into the creative process, whereby the needs and resources of the client are satisfied to produce an interior space that fulfills the project goals.

Interior design includes a scope of services performed by a professional design practitioner, qualified by means of education, experience, and examination, to protect and enhance the life, health, safety and welfare of the public. These services may include any or all of the following tasks:

      • Research and analysis of the client's goals and requirements; and development of documents, drawings and diagrams that outline those needs;
      • Formulation of preliminary space plans and two and three dimensional design concept studies and sketches that integrate the client's program needs and are based on knowledge of the principles of interior design and theories of human behavior;
      • Confirmation that preliminary space plans and design concepts are safe, functional, aesthetically appropriate, and meet all public health, safety and welfare requirements, including code, accessibility , environmental , and sustainability guidelines;
      • Selection of colors, materials and finishes to appropriately convey the design concept, and to meet socio-psychological, functional, maintenance , life-cycle performance, environmental, and safety requirements;
      • Selection and specification of furniture, fixtures, equipment and millwork, including layout drawings and detailed product description; and provision of contract documentation to facilitate pricing, procurement and installation of furniture;
      • Provision of project management services, including preparation of project budgets and schedules;
      • Preparation of construction documents , consisting of plans, elevations, details and specifications , to illustrate non-structural and/or non-seismic partition layouts; power and communications locations; reflected ceiling plans and lighting designs; materials and finishes; and furniture layouts;
      • Preparation of construction documents to adhere to regional building and fire codes, municipal codes, and any other jurisdictional statutes, regulations and guidelines applicable to the interior space ;
      • Coordination and collaboration with other allied design professionals who may be retained to provide consulting services, including but not limited to architects; structural, mechanical and electrical engineers, and various specialty consultants;
      • Confirmation that construction documents for non-structural and/or non-seismic construction are signed and sealed by the responsible interior designer, as applicable to jurisdictional requirements for filing with code enforcement officials;
      • Administration of contract documents , bids and negotiations as the client's agent;
      • Observation and reporting on the implementation of projects while in progress and upon completion, as a representative of and on behalf of the client; and conducting post-occupancy evaluation reports.

(X-16, X-17)

Last modified December 8, 2006
by Boris Teske, Prescott Memorial Library,
Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272