Research Competencies in School Psychology

Expected by NASP

Excerpts from:

National Association of School Psychologists. Standards for Training and Field Placement Programs in School Psychology. 2000.

2.3 Effective Instruction and Development of Cognitive/Academic Skills
2.4 Socialization and Development of Life Skills
2.7 Prevention, Crisis Intervention, and Mental Health
2.9 Research and Program Evaluation
2.11 Information Technology


2.3 Effective Instruction and Development of Cognitive/Academic Skills: School psychologists have knowledge of human learning processes, techniques to assess these processes, and direct and indirect services applicable to the development of cognitive and academic skills. School psychologists, in collaboration with others, develop appropriate cognitive and academic goals for students with different abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions. Such interventions include, but are not limited to, instructional interventions and consultation.

School psychologists maintain current information and research about advances in curriculum and instruction and share this information and research with educators, parents, and the community at large to promote improvement in instruction and student achievement.

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2.4 Socialization and Development of Life Skills: School psychologists have knowledge of human developmental processes, techniques to assess these processes, and direct and indirect services applicable to the development of behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social skills. School psychologists, in collaboration with others, develop appropriate behavioral, affective, adaptive, and social goals for students of varying abilities, disabilities, strengths, and needs; implement interventions to achieve those goals; and evaluate the effectiveness of interventions. Such interventions include, but are not limited to, consultation, behavioral assessment/intervention, and counseling.

School psychologists have knowledge of research on classroom climate and of ecological and behavioral approaches to classroom management.

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2.7 Prevention, Crisis Intervention, and Mental Health: School psychologists have knowledge of human development and psychopathology and of associated biological, cultural, and social influences on human behavior. School psychologists provide or contribute to prevention and intervention programs that promote the mental health and physical well-being of students.

School psychologists have knowledge of current theory and research about child and adolescent development; psychopathology; human diversity; biological, cultural, and social influences on behavior; societal stressors; crises in schools and communities; and other factors.

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2.9 Research and Program Evaluation: School psychologists have knowledge of research, statistics, and evaluation methods. School psychologists evaluate research, translate research into practice, and understand research design and statistics in sufficient depth to plan and conduct investigations and program evaluations for improvement of services.

School psychologists have knowledge of basic principles of research design, including single subject design and quantitative and qualitative research techniques, and apply the principles in their own research and as consumers of others' research. They differentiate acceptable from inadequate research and evaluate research in terms of its internal and external validity. They have knowledge of research and statistics in sufficient depth to evaluate published research and to plan and conduct their own investigations. They have knowledge of evaluation techniques and methods and integrate their knowledge of research, statistics, and evaluation when collecting data about school and community programs and in other program accountability activities. School psychologists have knowledge of measurement principles and psychometric standards and apply the knowledge when selecting and using assessment techniques and published tests. They review and evaluate validity research and psychometric properties when selecting the best assessment methods to use in data-based decision-making.

School psychologists maintain a professional knowledge base of research findings, professional literature, and other information relevant to their work and apply the knowledge base to all components of their work. They base their practice on sound research and translate new research findings into service delivery improvements. School psychologists have knowledge of and apply findings from intervention research when designing educational, mental health, or treatment programs for children.

School psychologists provide leadership in schools and other agencies in understanding and using research and evaluation data. They apply their knowledge and skills in statistics and measurement to assist school or agency personnel with valid interpretation and use of school and/or district data. School psychologists provide information about relevant research findings to school personnel, parents, and the public.

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2.11 Information Technology: School psychologists have knowledge of information sources and technology relevant to their work. School psychologists access, evaluate, and utilize information sources and technology in ways that safeguard or enhance the quality of services.

School psychologists recognize that advances in technology have many positive impacts on the dissemination of information, on their professional practice, and on services for children. School psychologists use the latest technological advances in their work, but also recognize the need to use technology in ways that safeguard or enhance the quality of services. School psychologists have knowledge of information sources and technology and of methods and standards for using information technology to enhance services. School psychologists wisely use information resources such as digital medium (e.g., CD-ROM), the World Wide Web, e-mail, interactive television, distance learning technology, etc. to acquire information, current research findings, and continuing professional development. School psychologists have knowledge and skills in using word processing, spread sheets, test scoring software, and other computer resources to function more effectively and efficiently. School psychologists have current knowledge about technology resources for children (e.g., instructional software, adaptive technology for individuals with disabilities) and use the resources when designing, implementing, and evaluating instructional programs or interventions for children.

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Last modified February 15, 2007
by Boris Teske, Prescott Memorial Library,
Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272