Research Competencies in Middle Level Teacher Education

Expected by NMSA

Excerpts from:

National Middle School Association. Middle Level Teacher Preparation Standards. 2001.

PERFORMANCE-BASED STANDARDS FOR INITIAL MIDDLE LEVEL TEACHER PREPARATION

Standard 1 Young Adolescent Development

Standard 2 Middle Level Philosophy and School Organization

Standard 3 Middle Level Curriculum and Assessment

Standard 5 Middle Level Instruction and Assessment

Standard 6 Family and Community Involvement

Standard 7 Middle Level Professional Roles

PROGRAMMATIC STANDARDS FOR MASTERS MIDDLE LEVEL TEACHER PREPARATION

Standard 1 Young Adolescent Development

Standard 2 Middle Level Philosophy and School Organization


PERFORMANCE-BASED STANDARDS FOR INITIAL MIDDLE LEVEL TEACHER PREPARATION

Standard 1 Young Adolescent Development

Middle level teacher candidates understand the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development, and they provide opportunities that support student development and learning.

(5)

Unacceptable Acceptable Target
Middle level candidates fail to show acceptable levels of knowledge of the concepts, principles, theories and research about young adolescent development. Middle level candidates demonstrate a knowledge of the concepts, principles, theories and research about young adolescent development. Middle level candidates demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the concepts, principles, theories and research about young adolescent development.

(6-7)

Standard 2 Middle Level Philosophy and School Organization

Middle level teacher candidates understand the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools, and they work successfully within these organizational components.

(7)

Unacceptable Acceptable Target
Middle level candidates fail to show acceptable levels of understanding of the concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical and historical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools. Middle level candidates demonstrate understanding of the concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical and historical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools. Middle level candidates demonstrate comprehensive understanding of the concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical and historical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools.

(8-9)

Standard 3 Middle Level Curriculum and Assessment

Middle level teacher candidates understand the major concepts, principles, theories, standards, and research related to middle level curriculum and assessment, and they use this knowledge in their practice.

(9)

Performances

Middle level teacher candidates:

2.   Use current knowledge and standards from multiple subject areas in planning, integrating, and implementing curriculum.

(10)

Standard 5 Middle Level Instruction and Assessment

Middle level teacher candidates understand and use the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to effective instruction and assessment

(13)

Knowledge

Middle level teacher candidates:

1.   Understand the principles of instruction and the research base that supports them.

5.   Understand ways to teach the basic concepts and skills of inquiry and communication.

Dispositions

Middle level teacher candidates:

7.   Appreciate the importance of teaching strategies that are current and supported by research and successful practice.

(14)

Standard 6 Family and Community Involvement

Middle level teacher candidates understand the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to working collaboratively with family and community members, and they use that knowledge to maximize the learning of all young adolescents.

(15)

Dispositions

Middle level teacher candidates:

2.   Realize the importance of privacy and confidentiality of information when working with family members.

(16)

Unacceptable Acceptable Target
Middle level candidates lack an understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to working collaboratively with family and community members. Middle level candidates demonstrate an understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to working collaboratively with family and community members. Middle level candidates demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to working collaboratively with family and community members.

(17)

Standard 7 Middle Level Professional Roles

Middle level teacher candidates understand the complexity of teaching young adolescents, and they engage in practices and behaviors that develop their competence as professionals.

(18)

Knowledge

Middle level teacher candidates:

9.   Know the skills of research/data-based decision-making.

(18)

Dispositions

Middle level teacher candidates:

6.   Are committed to refining classroom and school practices that address the needs of all young adolescents based on research, successful practice, and experience.

(19)

Performances

Middle level teacher candidates:

5.   Read professional literature, consult with colleagues, maintain currency with a range of technologies, and seek resources to enhance their professional competence.

Unacceptable Acceptable Target
Middle level candidates do not demonstrate understanding of the skills of research/data-based decision making Middle level candidates maintain an up-to-date understanding of the skills of research/data-based decision making Middle level candidates demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the skills of research/data-based decision making

(20)

Unacceptable Acceptable Target
Middle level candidates do no value life-long learning and are not committed to refining classroom and school practices that address the needs of all young adolescents based on research, successful practice, and experience. Middle level candidates hold expectations for their own life-long learning and are committed to refining classroom and school practices that address the needs of all young adolescents based on research, successful practice, and experience. Middle level candidates model life-long learning and take a leadership role in refining classroom and school practices that address the needs of all young adolescents based on research, successful practice, and experience.

(21)

PROGRAMMATIC STANDARDS FOR MASTERS MIDDLE LEVEL TEACHER PREPARATION

Standard 1 Young Adolescent Development

Middle level masters candidates understand and analyze the major concepts, principles, theories, and research related to young adolescent development, and they apply that knowledge in their practice.

(26)

Knowledge

Middle level masters candidates:

1.   Comprehensively understand the major concepts, principles, theories, and research of young adolescent development

(26)

Performances

Middle level masters candidates:

3.   Make decisions about curriculum and resources that reflect an understanding of young adolescent development using current research.

5.   Research and effectively address societal changes, including the changing portrait of young adolescents in the media

(27)

Unacceptable Acceptable Target
Middle level masters candidates lack adequate understanding of the concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the characteristics of adolescent development. Middle level masters candidates demonstrate comprehensive understanding of the concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the characteristics of adolescent development. Middle level masters candidates consistently and comprehensively demonstrate an understanding of the research that underpins adolescent development. Based on the scholarly literature, they discriminate among the best practices that promote the positive development of early adolescence.

(27)

Unacceptable Acceptable Target
Middle level masters candidates are neither knowledgeable of nor invested in developmentally responsive organizational structures that foster socially equitable educational practices. They fail to use techniques that address the nature and needs of the young adolescent that maximize student learning. Middle level masters candidates are committed to developmentally responsive organizational structures that foster socially equitable educational practices. They enthusiastically promote using techniques that address the nature and needs of the young adolescent that maximize student learning. Middle level masters candidates work to share their expanding knowledge of early adolescent development within a community wider than their own classroom. Their professional practice reflects current research on the nature and needs of young adolescents and they are role models for other educators.

(28)

Standard 2 Middle Level Philosophy and School Organization

Middle level masters candidates understand and analyze the major concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical foundations and organizational components of highly effective middle level schools, and they apply that knowledge in their practice.

(28)

Unacceptable Acceptable Target
Middle level masters candidates lack adequate understanding of the concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical and historical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools. Middle level masters candidates demonstrate comprehensive understanding of the concepts, principles, theories, and research underlying the philosophical and historical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools. Middle level masters candidates consistently and comprehensively demonstrate an understanding of the research that underpins the philosophical and historical foundations of developmentally responsive middle level programs and schools. Based on scholarly literature, they discriminate among the best school organizational practices including teaming and flexible use of instructional time.

(29)


Last modified February 11, 2007
by Boris Teske, Prescott Memorial Library,
Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA 71272