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This item originally appeared in the October 21, 2004 issue of The Tech Talk.

By HOLLY WEILEDER

Staff Writer

Happy 100th birthday, Lagniappe.

This year celebrates the Lagniappe's 90th issue, but the 100th anniversary of its birth. Although the Tech yearbook was first published in 1905, there were 10 years publication had to be put on hold.

From 1913 through 1921, World War I caused many things to shut down, including the Lagniappe. The book for 1926 is also missing for unknown reasons.

"It's really sad those years were not produced," Julie Miller, editor-in-chief, student life editor for the Lagniappe and a junior journalism major, said. "Now those students can't look back."

Traditionally, the Lagniappe staff keeps the theme of the yearbooks a secret until the release date.

"All this summer I was looking for a way to make this year's book special," Miller said. "I was so lucky to find out it was the 100th year because it makes it that much more special."

Kevin Allen, photo editor for the Lagniappe and a junior speech major, said students can expect something special.

"Because of its 100th anniversary, the photos will have a different feel than previous issues," Allen said. "And that's all I will say. The staff of photographers we have this year are four of the most talented people I've ever worked with."

A collection of past Lagniappes, which literally means "something extra," are available for students to view in the reference section of the library. When looking back through the years, interesting details may be found.

The 1905, 200-page edition has a "Quips and Cranks" section, which could be the equivalent of a witty shout-outs section today. Also, the few advertisements in the back advertise supplies such as half hose, suspenders, book straps and ink.

The 1941 book pictures show the "Home Economics Club," a club that no longer exists, which was then the largest organization on campus.

The 1974 book overflows with pleated skirts, chunky-heeled shoes, long hair, polyester and plaid.

Looking back through the years can be enlightening as well as entertaining.

"It's fun to look back through the years at all the people and organizations," Jill Rowlett, Greeks editor for the Lagniappe and a junior political science major, said.

Mary Brown, Lagniappe adviser for the past 16 years, said she is impressed with the improvements over the year.s

"There have been a lot of changes in technology," Brown said.

Miller is impressed with the staff as well.

"This staff is truly exceptional to work with, and everybody brings something different to the table," Miller said. "This will be the best yearbook Tech has ever seen."

The end of the school-year release date for this year's Lagniappe is May 16, 2005.


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